Volunteer Central

Thank you so much for committing to volunteer for Swingin’ D Horse Rescue! This private portal is where certified volunteers share information about horses, chores, events and other rescue business.

Bringing Visitors to Swingin' D

We appreciate you wanting to show off Swingin’ D and our horses to your friends and loved ones! To ensure everyone’s safety and the safety of our horses, we ask that you obtain permission before bringing any guests on the property. In addition, all guests are required to sign a liability release before entering the rescue. Thanks for helping us keep Swingin’ D safe!

Horses on the pond at Swingin' D Horse Rescue
  1. Muck paddocks, pens and shelters
  2. Muck
  3. Muck
  4. Prepare Chocos’ shelter for winter.
  5. Clean and organize the tack shed
    • Separate halters by size
    • Put leads on their own hooks
    • Organize shelves by category
    • Use shop vac to vacuum grain
    • Move saddles, pads and blankets to new building
    • Set up grain and supplies in new building near Skinnies
  6. Pour and mix grain into barrels
    • Mix 2 bags of grain with 2.5-percent fat with one bag of Producers Pride in barrel closest to shed door
    • Mix 1 bag Purina Senior with 1 bag SafeChoice Senior
    • If Junior is not full, mix in Dumor Complete or SafeChoice Original
  7. Walk fence line and photograph problem spots
  8. Groom all horses (except Choco), starting with the Skinnies
  9. Pick feet

Please use this form when conducting a checkup on adopted horses. When you’re assigned a horse, we’ll provide the top portion of information, and you’ll visit and fill in the rest!

Adopted Horse Visits

Facility Inspection

Horse Inspection

Horse inspections must be accompanied by photos of the horse from the following vantage points:
  • Overhead, from withers to tailbone to show spine and hipbones
  • Full body – left side, from shoulder to tail
  • Full body – right side, from shoulder to tail
  • All four feet
  • If you checked any of the horse’s bones visible above, or the horse resembles image 0, 1 or 2, please find a private area you can contact an SDHR board member and report your findings before leaving the boarding facility. It may be necessary to contact local authorities and take possession of the horse.
    body score diagram
    Please lift all four of the horse’s feet and examine their condition. Rate the horse’s foot health below.

    Horse and Adopter Evaluation

    Here’s where we’ll share information about horse health. Tell us what you’re seeing when you spend time with the horses, and we’ll share that information here.

    Go to Ranch Rules

    As of December 6, 2018, we’re concerned about Bo. He’s the paint to the left of Aubrey. He’s also the boss of the herd. Right now, he’s acting grumpy and not wanting anyone to touch him. That’s very unusual for Bo. While typically pretty businesslike, he still enjoys a little scratching and petting. He’s pinning his ears as you move from petting his face to his neck or further. We’ve called the vet, and she plans to visit on Friday, December 7 (that was her earliest appointment). We suspect he has a sheath bean that’s making him uncomfortable because his appetite is not affected and he’s exhibiting no other symptoms but grumpiness. Please be aware, and avoid touching Bo until the vet tells us what’s happening.

    As of December 6, 2018, Ralphie, the sorrel gelding in the photos below, has a raw spot under the top of his tail that requires cleaning, treating and bandaging every evening. He just finished antibiotics to treat the infection, but the wound is still healing. Please let us know if the bandage comes off or falls below the wound. Ralphie is typically pretty good to stand when you dress his wound. Just be sure to let him know you’re coming, and pat him along his back all the way to his tail before you touch the injury. 

    We’re currently dressing Ralphie’s wound by cleaning it with warm chlorhexidine. Saturate a strip of cotton with the concoction in the Muck Itch bottle and slather manuka honey on top of it. Stick the cotton to the wound and wrap it with gauze wrap. Saturate the dressing with the Muck Spray, then cover it with self-adhesive wound wrap. All of the supplies are in the tack shed.

    Our volunteers are our eyes and ears on the ranch. Some days, you’ll spend more time with the horses than we will. Please let us know if you see anything that requires our attention. Please also text Tami if you believe a horse is injured or sick.

    Please enter your email if you’d like for us to follow up with you.

    Here’s where you can find links to all the forms for volunteers. Please let us know if we’re missing anything.

    Volunteer Agreement

    Volunteer Application (for your friends)

    Visitor Liability Waivers

    Volunteer Guide (work in progress)

    Rescue Rules

    Get to know our horses

    Choco - chocolate overo gelding

    Choco – 13-year-old chocolate overo gelding Choco is easy peasy. Hes in quarantine, so do not touch any of the other horses after you touch him. Feed Choco last, unless you can feed him without touching anything!

       
    Go to Ranch Rules

    Bo (the Boss) and Aubrey (his queen)

    Bo, the Boss, and his Queen, Aubrey. Bo and Aubrey are the undisputed Mom and Dad of the herd. Aubrey is aloof and unimpressed with all the testosterone coursing through the herd. She adores the babies but has little patience for their shenanigans. She pins those ears and gives the Mare Glare, and quickly whips the herd into shape. She would rather not be the leader, so she lets Bo wear the crown. Aubrey would prefer to eat and… well, eat, as her booty reflects.

    Bo is first to eat. He eats in the paddock next to the tack shed. Aubrey eats in the paddock between Bo and the Ghosts.

    ""

    Elvis – the King

    Elvis was severely abused, so he still has trust issues. Approach him from the side with caution, using a soft voice and slow movements. Second in command, Elvis is responsible for standing watch for Bo, alerting Bo if danger or a stranger is near, and disciplining the babies. Elvis also loves to roughhouse and play with Winston.

    Elvis is patient and will do what he is told at feeding time, so we usually feed him last. He eats along the fence where the main gate to the pasture is.

    Image of Winston

    The One and Only Winston – 2-year-old gelding

    I almost feel like I gave birth to this baby. Such is the bond I have with precious Winston. Like Ralphie, Winston was afraid of his own shadow when he arrived; only unlike Ralphie, Winston was more likely to take an aggressive path without the right intervention. Smart as a whip and tough enough to fight for himself, Winston would figure out a way to survive. Because he knows he is loved and secure, he has great respect for the humans who lead him. Winston is a typical Terrible Two toddler. He loves to be in the middle of everything. Ne fears nothing. You will quickly learn, when making plans around the ranch, plan around Winston!

    At feeding time, Winston sticks with Aubrey until the final separation. He eats in the pen between the main barn and the back paddock.

    Ralphie

    Ralphie – 4-year-old sorrel? gelding

    Ralphie was afraid of absolutely everything when he arrived. I had several people tell me he was too far gone. It was a waste of time. He would never come around. “Maybe there was a reason he was sent to slaughter.” But there was something in his eyes that told me he really, really wanted to try. It was like he was trying to say, “I do not want to be like this. I want to be close to you. I wish you could touch me.” I worked so hard, for so long to earn the trust of a baby that did nothing but land in the hands of a cruel, abusive owner. Ralphie has come a million miles from the days when he could not stand to be touched, but he still has fears. Be patient with him, and help me show him I am not the only human worthy of his love and trust.

    Ralphie eats in the stall inside the barn.

    Chap

    Chap – 8-year-old gelding

    HEADS UP: Chap left for 30 days of training on December 7, 2018. We’ll see him again after the New Year!

    Chap is not a rescue. In fact, we’re pretty sure he lived a pampered life before coming to our little herd of scraggly slaughter horses. He loves to be close to humans, likes to nuzzle his face against you, and is pretty laid back and easy to handle. Chap gets along well with the other horses. He has no interest in being the boss, but he also has no interest in Ralphie and Winston nosing in on his territory. He has no problem whipping them into shape. (Everyone whips them into shape!) At feeding time, Chap goes inside the main part of the barn.

    ""

    The Ghosts – 17- and 8-year-old geldings go together

    The Ghosts are THE BOMB! They love, love, love being around people and will follow you everywhere – just like puppies! Everest (the grey) can be hard of hearing, but you can get him moving pretty easily if you move Romeo (palomino). They are the BEST of friends, except around meal time. Do NOT feed them from inside their pen. Be sure to feed through the fence, and feed them far apart, because they will kick the fire out of each other if they are too close.

    Photo of Alfred and RavenThe Skinnies share the paddock next to the carport. They were both frighteningly thin when they arrived at the D from the same kill pen, within a week of each other. Alfred is a big old lumbering gentleman – like an old butler. He has very good ground manners, but he is very serious about his meals.

    Raven is shy and quiet and very polite. I get the impression she was well taken care of – probably even pampered in her life. She came in with expensive designer shoes! She can be skittish, so approach her calmly and respectfully.

    Both Alfred and Raven are very well trained and know how to act. They are still learning to trust, so take your time with them.

    Facility Inspection

    Horse Inspection

    Horse inspections must be accompanied by photos of the horse from the following vantage points:
  • Overhead, from withers to tailbone to show spine and hipbones
  • Full body - left side, from shoulder to tail
  • Full body - right side, from shoulder to tail
  • All four feet
  • If you checked any of the horse's bones visible above, or the horse resembles image 0, 1 or 2, please find a private area you can contact an SDHR board member and report your findings before leaving the boarding facility. It may be necessary to contact local authorities and take possession of the horse.
    body score diagram
    Please lift all four of the horse's feet and examine their condition. Rate the horse's foot health below.

    Horse and Adopter Evaluation

    Oklahoma Livestock Activities Liability Limitation Act

    The state of Oklahoma values the impact of equine activities on its people and economy, so the legislature enacted a law that protects the sponsors of livestock activities. The Oklahoma Livestock Activities Liability Limitation Act recognizes the risks inherent to working with horses, and puts the responsibility for those risks in the hands of the participant. 

    What does that mean for a volunteer? It means it’s up to you to understand what could happen when you choose to step into the space of a 1,000-pound animal with a walnut-sized brain.

    Swingin’ D strives to make the ranch as safe as possible. We have rules and guidelines to ensure your safety; but we can’t predict what a horse will do, and we can’t guarantee your safety. 

    Please make yourself familiar with state law, carry insurance that covers accidental injury, notify SDHR any time you see a potential hazard, and keep your head on a swivel any time you’re in an area where horses may be present.